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January 2016

Mohammad Anas Wahaj | 30 jan 2016

A panel of health experts from the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), the Public Health Foundation of India and the National Institute of Nutrition, recently demanded pictorial and health warning on junk food packets in order to provide information to people on health issues caused by them. According to Prof. Vandana Jain, in-charge of Division of Pedriatrics Endocrinology at AIIMS, 'We have recommended pictorial warnings on junk foods...or health warnings saying that this product contains fat and salt in excess of what is recommended or even a picture of liver may be put on pack indicating that consuming them may lead to fatty liver in children and adults.' Consumption of products with high sugar, fat and salt have adverse health implications and World Health Organization (WHO) has stated that the best way to prevent obesity among children is to put restrictions on marketing of unhealthy foods. Read on...

The Economic Times: Health experts demand pictorial warnings on junk food packets
Author: NA


Mohammad Anas Wahaj | 30 jan 2016

According to the 2016 Best Countries Ranking of U.S. News, prepared in collaboration with Wharton School and BAV Consulting, India is included at top of the Movers ranking of countries with up-and-coming economies, and overall it is ranked 22nd. Prof. David J. Reibstein, who teaches marketing at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and participated in developing the rankings, says 'Nations should pay attention to how they are seen by others, since enhancing these perceptions could create a large economic benefit. The experience of tourists is just one of the factors that colour those impressions, along with the experiences of customers, investors, followers of global news and social media, and what people hear from others.' Read on...

Warc: India is the top mover nation
Author: NA


Mohammad Anas Wahaj | 08 jan 2016

Technology-driven healthcare startups are finding new opportunities in India's mostly traditional healthcare system. But it is not an easy ride, with lack of digital orientation, policy and regulational scenario, slow pace of change in the healthcare industry etc. Simply put, these healthcare pioneers in India face more challenges than what the normal startups actually do. Mudit Vijayvergiya, Co-founder of Curofy, provides five most relevant challenges that all healthcare startups are broadly facing in India - (1) Slow Growth: Sluggish pace of growth of the industry is hard for survival. (2) Complex Industry: Complex rules and regulations can be obstacles for entrepreneurship and innovative thinking. Various policies are unclear and cause confusion at workplace. (3) Doctors are Tough: Miserable doctor patient ratio of 1:1700 and horrible 1:60000 in rural areas, make availability of doctors rare. Moreover digital healthcare is last on their mind. (4) Monetization: Slow growth of sector makes startups hard to monetize and to have a sustainable revenue model. Moreover social nature of the market and lack of financial ability of patients make it hard for private startups to make money. (5) Lack of Healthcare Mentors in India: Although India has large pool of trained medical professionals, but it has very few seasoned mentors and investors in the health-tech space to share their experience with entrepreneurs. Moreover track record of startups in healthcare is not very good either. Thus India currently lacks a win-win scenario for mentors, investors and entrepreneurs. Read on...

iamwire: 5 Biggest Challenges All Healthcare Tech Startups are Facing in India
Author: Mudit Vijayvergiya


Mohammad Anas Wahaj | 06 jan 2016

Entrepreneurship is an essential component of the market economy. Entrepreneurs seek new opportunities through their extraordinary drive and skills, create enterprises that provide employment and generate revenues, to help economy grow. To successfully take leverage of demographic dividend and build a thriving economy, India needs to focus on entrepreneurship and continue to build an ecosystem that facilitates new venture development. As Kunal Bahl, Co-founder of Snapdeal, rightly said recently, 'India needs more entrepreneurs and less policy.' Given below is the partial list of Indian entrepreneurs that have created startups and hold a great promise in 2016 - (1) Abhinav Asthana, Postman (2) Jaydeep Barman, Faasos (3) Sahil Barua, Delhivery (4) Abhiraj Bhal, Urbanclap (5) Hitendra Chaturvedi, Greendust (6) Sunil Coushik, Prijector (7) Abhishek Goyal, Tracxn (8) Nalin Gupta, Auro Robotics (9) Virendra Gupta, Dailyhunt (10) Amit Jain, Cardekho (11) Nithin Kamath, Zerodha (12) Mohit Kumar, Roadrunnr (13) Byju Raveendran, Byju's (14) Abhinav Shashank, Innovaccer (15) MN Srinivasu, Billdesk (16) Rajesh Yabaji, Blackbuck. Read on...

The Economic Times: 16 startup founders to watch out for in 2016
Author: NA


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